October 17, 2017

The Right Gas Chromatograph for the Job

By Bonnie Crossland, Product Marketing Manager – Gas Chromatographs, Emerson Automation Solutions

Balancing the right level of gas chromatograph (GC) performance and cost for individual applications and locations within a plant or installation is key for many operators. Increased pressure to optimize processes is driving an increased demand for accurate and timely composition analysis for use in process control and product quality assurance. To continue to meet these demands, Emerson’s Rosemount 1500XA process gas chromatograph adds new enhancements to provide faster compositional feedback and complete, high-resolution analysis, helping operators optimize product specifications and maximize throughput.

Rosemount™ 1500XA Process Gas Chromatograph

The Rosemount™ 1500XA process gas chromatograph is designed for refining, petrochemical, power, and environmental applications where selected components in gaseous or liquid streams must be precisely monitored on a continuous basis. The recent enhancements to the 1500XA enable parallel chromatography, offering oven capacity for up to eight chromatograph valves and four detectors, two of which can be flame detectors. Depending on the application, the 1500XA can include flame ionization or flame photometric detectors for measurement of compounds in the parts-per-billion ranges, or thermal conductivity detectors (TCD) capable of handling applications with parts-per-million measurement requirements.

The 1500XA, like the entire Emerson GC family, is characterized by ease-of-use, ruggedness, and reliability. Emerson is currently the only online GC supplier to offer a lifetime warranty on chromatograph valves. The valves are rated for more than five million operations before repair, which involves simply replacing the diaphragms and can be done easily on-site.

With its numerous valves and detectors, the 1500XA can take a complex analysis application and break it down into smaller, simpler analysis blocks. These blocks are then run in parallel, reducing analysis time and providing faster, easier maintenance and troubleshooting, as well as straightforward data analysis. A complex analysis that may have previously taken 20 minutes may now only take 10 minutes, allowing quicker response to process changes. The 1500XA’s concurrent analysis can be used to reduce the time between analyses by running them at offset times. This can increase the number of analyses within a set time period.

Emerson’s MON2020 software allows the 1500XA to operate completely unattended while making analyzer configuration, maintenance, and data collection easy, either locally or remotely. With intuitive dropdown menus and fill-in-the-blank tables, even new users can quickly navigate through the software.

Since many users are looking for cost-effective and reliable GC solutions, the 1500XA with parallel chromatography and concurrent analysis capabilities more than fulfills that need. When combined with the 370XA and 700XA gas chromatographs, the 1500XA rounds out the widest single selection of gas chromatographs on the market. This makes the Emerson GC family flexible, and reduces costs for integrators and users alike. Used in a wide range of industries, the Emerson GC line allows users to get precisely the performance they require in each location and application while maintaining the same easy-to-use interfaces, the unique software capabilities, and common maintenance requirements.

If you have any questions, comment HERE. Or, to learn more about the right GC for the job, visit Emerson.com/RosemountGasAnalysis.

August 16, 2017

Pardon Us While We Bask

Hi everyone. You know that here at Analytic Expert we focus on bringing you solutions-oriented information to solve your plant and processing problems. Today however, we’d like to pause and give you a glimpse into what your confidence in us means.

The Asian Manufacturing Awards were conceived in 2012 to recognize companies that deliver cutting-edge industrial technology solutions and services in control, instrumentation, and automation. This year, the Awards received close to 100 nominations across the 25 award categories. The nominations were assessed by a judging panel made up of ten internationally recognized experts and practitioners from a variety of industry sectors and disciplines. Their extensive industry knowledge and experience enabled them to adjudicate effectively and ensure deserving winners in each category.

Emerson has participated since 2012 and has won a number of awards in this prestigious event, but this year was the topper (so far) –

AMA AWARDS 2017 – Automation & Control Category:

  • Best Process Instrumentation Provider sixth year in the row
  • Best Industrial Wireless Provider for the fourth time
  • Best Process Control Systems Provider four years in row
  • Best Process Safety System Provider

AMA AWARDS 2017- Industry Solution Category:

  • Best Power & Energy Solutions Provider for the second time
  • Best Refinery Solutions Provider for the second year

The Awards Ceremony Gala Dinner was held July 27th at the Mandarin Orchard Hotel Singapore, Imperial Ballroom, and, as you’ll see from all our photos, a great time was had by all.

Thank you for your interaction, challenges, and confidence that make awards like these both possible and gratifying. And thank you for letting us take a moment to bask in the glory.

December 22, 2015

Celebrating the Holidays with a Throwback!

 

We’re deep into the winter holiday season, so we thought it would be interesting to take a break from our normal process technology news and take a look back at one of our popular throwback blog posts from our archives about the origins of some of the winter holidays we celebrate. Enjoy and happy holidays from all of us at Emerson Process Management, Rosemount!

How Much Solstice Do You Know?
Since we’re getting in a winter holiday mood, we thought it would be interesting to track some of the origins of holidays at midwinter … so here we go.

downloadThe winter solstice in the northern hemisphere is the time at which the sun appears at noon at its lowest altitude above the horizon. It occurs on the shortest day and longest night of the year. The significance of the midwinter event appears to have been recognized even during Neolithic and bronze age times. At Stonehenge in Britain and Newgrange in Ireland, the axes of the structures seem to have been carefully aligned to the solstice sunrise (Newgrange) and sunset (Stonehenge). The solstice would have been very significant to people not certain of living through a harsh winter, called the “famine months.” In temperate climates, the midwinter festival was the last feast celebration before deep winter began. Most cattle were slaughtered so they would not have to be fed during the winter, so it was almost the only time of year when a supply of fresh meat was available. The majority of wine and beer made during the year was finally fermented and ready for drinking at this time – a cause for celebration in uncertain times.

winter-solstice-sunrise-to-sunsetKnowledge of when the solstice occurs has only recently been determined to near its instant according to precise astronomical data tracking. It is not possible to detect the actual instant of the solstice. To be precise to a single day, one must be able to observe a change in azimuth, or elevation less than or equal to about 1/60 of the angular diameter of the sun. Observing that it occurred within a two-day period is easier, requiring an observation precision of only about 1/16 of the angular diameter of the sun. Thus, many observations are of the day of the solstice rather than the instant. This is often done by watching the sunrise and sunset using an astronomically aligned instrument that allows a ray of light to cast on a certain point around that time.

There are many, many celebrations that occur at or around the winter solstice. But no matter how you celebrate midwinter, we hope the time is full of love, laughter, and light.

February 11, 2014

Ground Loop Scenarios Part 2

By C.D. Feng

Happy New Year! Time flies.

In my last blog post, I discussed the basics of ground loop, the most common and yet dreaded phrase field service engineers hear when electrochemistry-based sensors misbehave.

Here is where we left off last time:

1

The equivalent circuit of a pH sensor in a sample solution, where Eg is the voltage developed at the pH glass electrode of the pH sensor, Er, the voltage developed at the reference electrode of the pH sensor, Rg, the resistance of the pH glass membrane, Rr, the resistance of the reference junction, and Rs, the resistance of the solution.

The signal of the pH sensor is Eg – Er, and we can obtain the signal by measuring it with a voltmeter as connected below:

2

Now, we have the equivalent circuit of the pH sensor connected to a pH meter (a voltmeter).

The two open-ended nodes are now connected to the voltmeter, and form a closed circuit loop. In other words, the sensor in the sample solution is not an open circuit anymore. Once it’s a closed circuit loop, there will be current flowing through the loop, because there are batteries in the loop.

3

 In this case, the voltage measured is not exactly Eg – Er anymore, but:

 Eg – Er – iRg – iRs – iRr                                                                    (1)

However, a modern pH meter has EXTREMELY HIGH INPUT IMPEDANCE, which means that it will not allow almost any current passing through it, i.e. the current ‘i’ through the closed loop is close to zero.  Zero times any number is still zero, so the above equation becomes:

 Eg – Er                                                                                           (2)

This means a pH meter can accurately measure the signal from the pH sensor. This is also why you can not use a regular voltmeter to measure the signal of a pH sensor.

Is this circuit loop a ground loop?

Unfortunately no. Very close, but not a ground loop.

However, the practice above is a very good warm up for me to describe the ground loop in my next blog post. And with the practice above, you have learnt the critical requirement of a pH meter, the EXTREMELY HIGH INPUT IMPEDANCE.

In the real world, the EXTREMELY HIGH INPUT IMPEDANCE of the pH meter can be compromised, either by the low quality or deterioration of the cable connecting from the pH meter to the pH sensor, or by the contamination of the terminals either at the pH meter or at the sensor.

Once it’s compromised, you will have an i in equation (1), and when that happens, your pH meter will not measure the pure pH sensor signal Eg – Er anymore, it will have an erroneous reading, and equation (1) tells you exactly why.

Talk soon!

December 10, 2013

How Much Solstice Do You Know?

Hi everyone. Since we’re getting in a winter holiday mood, we thought it would be interesting to track some of the origins of holidays at midwinter … so here we go.

c3cf29e70c74bc9d375c27d06549d1a5The winter solstice in the northern hemisphere is the time at which the sun appears at noon at its lowest altitude above the horizon. It occurs on the shortest day and longest night of the year. The significance of the midwinter event appears to have been recognized even during Neolithic and bronze age times. At Stonehenge in Britain and Newgrange in Ireland, the axes of the structures seem to have been carefully aligned to the solstice sunrise (Newgrange) and sunset (Stonehenge). The solstice would have been very significant to people not certain of living through a harsh winter, called the “famine months.” In temperate climates, the midwinter festival was the last feast celebration before deep winter began. Most cattle were slaughtered so they would not have to be fed during the winter, so it was almost the only time of year when a supply of fresh meat was available. The majority of wine and beer made during the year was finally fermented and ready for drinking at this time – a cause for celebration in uncertain times.

winter-solstice-fairbanks-alaskaKnowledge of when the solstice occurs has only recently been determined to near its instant according to precise astronomical data tracking. It is not possible to detect the actual instant of the solstice. To be precise to a single day, one must be able to observe a change in azimuth, or elevation less than or equal to about 1/60 of the angular diameter of the sun. Observing that it occurred within a two-day period is easier, requiring an observation precision of only about 1/16 of the angular diameter of the sun. Thus, many observations are of the day of the solstice rather than the instant. This is often done by watching the sunrise and sunset using an astronomically aligned instrument that allows a ray of light to cast on a certain point around that time.

There are many, many celebrations that occur at or around the winter solstice. Most familiar of these are Christmas which is celebrated by the Christian world, Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights, Hogmanay in Scotland, Junkanoo in the Bahamas and Jamaica, Yule celebrated by the Germanic peoples, Dongzhi Festival practiced in some East Asian cultures, and many more.

No matter how you celebrate midwinter, we hope the time is full of love, laughter, and light.

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